Girlfriend to the Rescue

After her jog in the park, Diana Knight changed her outfit from sneakers and a jogging suit into a blouse, skirt, and loafers. Suddenly, as she grabbed her jacket, she received a message that her boyfriend was being held hostage. On the street, a man made a vulgar comment and grabbed her posterior; she kicked him in the stomach. 

Once she arrived at the destination, she knocked out a few guards with tranquilizers. She freed her boyfriend, then BANG! Shots were fired. Diana knocked over the assailant and jumped on his chest. Her boyfriend then kissed her cheek and she hugged him.

This is a post for Friday Fictioneers by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields; photo by Sarah Potter. 

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An Unusual Romantic Encounter

Businesswoman Regina Jacobsen gave a presentation at Nick Wright’s college. Nick cut hearts out of the bread as he made a PB & J sandwich. Suddenly, he dropped his sandwich and Regina stepped on it while stopping to greet Nick. He said, “Hey, Regina! Your boots look nice on you!”

Regina looked down and raised her foot upon seeing the sandwich, stuck to her boot. Nick removed the sandwich and Regina said, “I am so sorry…especially with the heart!”

He pointed to the heart and smiled. They leaned forward to kiss amid cheers and toasts.

This is a postfor Friday Fictioneers by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, photo by Kelvin M. Knight.

Halfway Around the World

Steve Freeman’s plane touched down in Bangkok, Thailand. He grabbed his carry-on bag, then grabbed his luggage from inside the airport, and met his contact, Sarawut. They greeted. Sarawut suggested, “Let’s stop by a temple and release a bird tomorrow, ok?” Steve agreed.

The next day they released a bird at a temple. Steve watched the bird fly away and a cat vainly try to catch it. The scene caused Steve to reflect on his own life: he related to the caged bird. He remembered his upbringing back in USA: he remembered the restrictive cult he was raised in, how he lacked opportunities, and felt like he was going nowhere. He remembered encounters that gave him the courage, like the bird, to leave the cage. Thus, he smiled at the bird. “Fly on, my friend”, he said.

Steve related to a monk’s describing the Noble Truths of Buddhism. “Association with what is disliked is painful, disassociation with what is liked is painful, not getting what one wishes is painful.” The monk went on to identify cravings as the cause of suffering. Steve found himself identifying with these statementts.

Afterwards, Sarawut and Steve went shopping in the floating market.

This is a post for Sunday Photo Fiction; also the source of the photo.

The Vision

Mike finally reached the top of the mountain, where he cried out, “Is there anyone up there? I am at a loss! My life is wasted! What should I do!?”

He thought of the lost years supporting a leader claiming to for God, the trauma of that controlling environment. Mike wept. Suddenly, in a vision, he saw flowers growing at his feet. A dove flew by, singing. He saw people abandoning weapons. He saw himself in a room among a group of people. Mike asked, “Was that You, God?” A gentle breeze blew.

Mike confidently left the mountain.

This is a post for Friday Fictioneers by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields; photo by Danny Bowman.

The Genocide Begins

Istanbul, 24 April 1915:

The door fly open and soldiers enter the home, arresting Dikran Chökürian, one of many Armenian writers.

Eastern Turkey, a few months later:

The Najarian family huddles together at the sound of hooves signaling the approach of Turkish death squads. Marta holds her daughter Mari close as a soldier grabs her and holds her down while she screams, “Hayır!”* repeatedly. The soldier ignores her, insulting her. He then shoots her. 

The villagers are deported, and marched through the desert. Mari collapses from fatigue and dehydration. A soldier shoots her.

A Turkish family shelters a survivor.

*Hayır is Turkish for “No”. 

This Friday Fictioneers story is dedicated to the 1.5 Armenians killed in the Armenian Genocide during WWI. Hitler later asked, “After all, who today speaks of the annihilation of Armenia?” The answer is many do. #NeverForget. To this day the Turkish government denies the genocide. The event started with the deportation of around 250 Armenian intellectuals on April 24, 1915, of which writer Dikran Chökürian was but one. 

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields has arranged for this Friday Fictioneers, and Liz Young provided the photo. 

Murphy’s Law in Action

Fahrünnisa, being short on time slipped on a pair of low-heeled dress shoes instead of the oxfords, and stomped a spider that showed up. “That’s bad karma”, Max said.

“Get in the car”, she replied, pushing the unlock button. She started the car and floored the accelerator. Once at the conference, a man snatched her purse and ran off. The thief gave the purse to a vendor. When the vendor refused to hand it over, Fahrünnisa stepped on the tomatoes. She and Max then fell over when they were injected with syringes. “Don’t oppose Erdoğan”, a voice said.

This is a post for Friday Fictioneers by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, photo by Magaly Guerrero.

Unlikely Meal

Rania pulled into Steve’s driveway and the two of them went into the apartment, Steve carrying pizza and Rania carrying food from her native Syria. Opening the pizza box once they were seated at the table, Steve said, “No pepperoni, no pork!”

“Jazak’Allah*”, Rania replied.

Before they started eating, Rania said, “Bismi’Allah**” and Steve said grace.

Steve turned on the news and saw a report on a suicide bombing in Egypt, and heared inflammatory comments from the US government.

“Turn that off”, Rania said, “an American and Syrian sharing a meal; that’s what’s important!”

With that, they kissed. 

*Jazak’Allah means “May God reward you”, a Muslim way of expressing gratitude.

**Bismi’Allah means “In the Name of Allah”, commonly said before eating.

This is a post for Friday Fictioneers by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, photo by Dale Rogerson